Ellie Edna Rose-Davies, Her Story part 2……………………

‘Now, a little over a year later, as far as I’m aware, I’m cancer-free. Yet nothing will be the same again. Cancer has changed my outlook on the world regarding the people in my life, my identity and mortality. I’m sure anyone who goes through something like this experiences a level of shock, no matter what age. But as a young person barely into my 20s, cancer presented me, for the very first time, with the fragility of life and the human body. However, I’ve gained a lot through this shift in perspective. Now I feel I am no longer Continue Reading …

Ellie Edna Rose-Davies : Her Story, part 1………………………………

At the age of just 22, the very last thing you want to hear is that you have stage 4 cancer, but for some people the only response is to tackle it head on – which is just what Ellie Edna Rose-Davies did ‘I barely noticed it at first. A bump on the right side of my neck, small but definite. I was 22 and had no health issues (I’d never even broken a bone), so I didn’t think much of the lump. But my boyfriend was concerned, so I made an appointment to go to the GP. For the Continue Reading …

Support for you as Lockdown restrictions ease……….

This year has been like no other, although some will say there have been similarities with the war years.  During the pandemic, all of us have been affected one way or another.  Lockdown measures have created serious threats to our emotional wellbeing, particularly from loneliness. We’ve lost valuable aspects of our social connections with others, such as hugs and handshakes, social activities and simply sharing the same physical space with family and friends. We have had to cope with the loss of power and control over our lives, and maybe with the loss of our job or income. Health services Continue Reading …

Russ’s Story………………

After 7 hours in surgery; 9 months off work; 3 years of chemo; 4 years of drug trials; and 10 years of post-cancer treatment and monitoring, Russ got the ‘all-clear’ from cancer. He doesn’t have any advice to give on how to get through cancer, but here are some of the things that worked for him. “I realised very quickly that I was helpless. I didn’t ‘fight cancer’. I just lay in a bed while the NHS fought it for me. I was a battlefield, not a combatant. But oddly, feeling helpless allowed me to slip into a relaxed attitude Continue Reading …

Grief and the Holidays…………….

Christmas candles

Eid, Chanukah, Christmas, and New Year – it has been imprinted on our psyche from a young age that we spend special holidays with family. This has been a year like no other and many of us will be unable to be with our loved ones, either because a loved one has died or Covid restrictions prevent us from meeting up. We will miss our loved ones even more than usual. Our sense of loss is magnified – the sadness deepens and the sense of loneliness can feel isolating. How can we celebrate togetherness when those we hold so dearly Continue Reading …

Coping with Cancer and Covid……

This year has challenged us all. But for Sarah Hughes it’s been particularly hard. Here, she talks about living with cancer – and letting in the light in the darkest of times. ”The strangest thing about having an incurable illness during a time of pandemic is the weird but unavoidable sense that everyone has finally caught up with you. As people started talking about how worried they were, how they couldn’t stop thinking about the virus, how difficult life now seemed, how isolated, the temptation to say: “Hey guys, welcome to my world” was overwhelming. The thing about living with Continue Reading …

National Bereavement Partnership Helpline (Covid 19 hub)……….

National Bereavement helpline logo 1

Telephone: 0800 448 0800   We are in unprecedented times as a result of COVID-19. It is a worrying and anxious time for many people. This is particularly the case for those whose loved ones have died, or are ill or dying in hospital or other care settings, and for key workers and NHS staff who continue to work and provide essential services. The National Bereavement Partnership have launched a helpline for all individuals who need to speak to someone in these very uncertain and emotional times. Call the free helpline: 0800 448 0800 helpline@nationalbereavementpartnership.org Rt Hon Matt Hancock MP – Secretary of State for Health and Social Care comments on National Bereavement Continue Reading …

Impact of Covid 19 on Urgent Care and GP appointments…..

The NHS is launching a new campaign to make sure people continue to seek urgent care during a medical emergency, (such as suspected heart attacks and strokes), after visits to A&E dropped by 50% this month. These figures are due to an understandable fear of catching Coronavirus, but also for some not wanting to be a burden to an already over-stretched service. But lives are being lost because of this. Figures are also coming to light of fewer cancers being diagnosed. This might be down to the same reasons, but also a reluctance to visit the GP with symptoms that Continue Reading …

Coronavirus…..

Information about the virus A coronavirus is a type of virus. As a group, coronaviruses are common across the world. Typical symptoms of coronavirus include fever and a cough that may progress to a severe pneumonia causing shortness of breath and breathing difficulties. Generally, coronavirus can cause more severe symptoms in people with weakened immune systems, older people, and those with long-term conditions like cancer, diabetes and chronic lung disease. For people going through cancer, or those caring for someone who is, use the 111 online coronavirus service for more information, or contact your consultant or specialist nurse. General advice Everyone Continue Reading …

Cancer Care Survey…….

As part of an NHS survey, more than 70,000 people who have undergone cancer treatment in England have been asked about their care. Although the NHS said cancer survival rates, and patient satisfaction with cancer care, were at a record high, a quarter of people said they did not have the possible side effects explained prior to the start of treatment. And more than a third (39%) said the longer-term side-effects of treatment were not fully explained – Macmillan Cancer Support said that equated to about 120,000 people a year. There’s no doubt about it, cancer is one of the Continue Reading …